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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
was put to work in foreign policy. and what do you do if you're a negotiator you ask for a hundred percent and several for 50. you say the union reserves the right to lie cheat and steal he called it an evil empire before the national association of evangelicals in orlando, you can't make this stuff up. and then in 1985, safely reelected he meets with gorbachev and led to standing in the red square with gorbachev and say there's no longer an evil empire that belonged to another time. a year later the year he left the office ten months after he left washington the berlin wall comes down. so i think michael's exactly right about yes, coming out of the presidency he seemed to be an era of greed and deficits but it's pretty safe to say right now he's remembered for pretty effective foreign policy. >> rose: i want to focus on foreign policy. so what is the challenge for the president in foreign policy? >> my discussions with him for the first book i did obama's wars and looking exactly how he makes decisions, it's very clear he does not like war, he has a deep aversion to war. his challenge in
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
the turmoil in north africa overall affected u.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova."
controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, charlie, that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in syria. and i think h
to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
the u.s. state department and foreign policy advisors have been very concerned about the threat. they say yes, it should be an african response. it's an african issue but the u.s. has interest at stake here. >> rose: what is the debate maybe within state, within the white house, within the defense department about american options? >> well, american options are limited by american law right now. because u.s. law pro ibt hads assisting a government or a military that came to power through a coup. and right now the malian government that we are trying to support in their efforts to control the rebels and to control the al qaeda and islamic militants in mali came to power through coup. so we can't provide them direct assistance. so u.s. law prohibits that. we're finding work arounds what that mean as secretary clinton laid out today is that by this weekend there will be military trainers in the area to train african militaries to go into mali, we'll be paying for that. we will be helping to fund the airlift to bring in a french battalion. there will be about 600 troops coming in wi
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
flowing just beneath the surface. the disagreement on foreign and domestic policy is both deep and real. the white house used this week to foreshadow coming debates over guns an butter. >> if there's even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, then we've got an obligation to try it. republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. gwen: so the sque why are all these gauntlets being thrown down even inauguration? >> it's the best time do it. he's now at the apex of his presidency. it will never get any sweeter -- gwen: it doesn't get better than this? >> he is already a lame duck. he's gun his second election. we've already talked about people will succeed him. by his own calculation he's got 16 months to make it his mark. he has to come out of the box, fast and energetic. he's coming out on guns, immigration, fiscal policy. he needs to push the other side defering to his judgment while he has the opportunity to do
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)